View Poll Results: Which would you prefer?

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  • a small inexpensive gift

    9 60.00%
  • a personalized card

    6 40.00%
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Thread: Holiday money shortages

  1. #11
    Junior Member
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    Hi again
    to ninny 52---
    sometimes you can get your unemployment extended, or so i've heard. :?: :?: what kind of work have you done before? poor health doesn't help, i know. where are you from? i'm in the middle of oklahoma. there is work here, but not that much where they will pay what i was making before. i can't drive very far after work without falling asleep, so i need work fairly close to home.
    i took care of people with developmental disabilities. i really liked it.
    good luck with everything
    toni
    PEACE ON EARTH

  2. #12
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    Hey there Granny Toni,
    I live in Illinois, close to the St. Louis area. I work in the food service department/field. I have worked in hospitals and nursinghomes for the past 28 years. I am trying to get on at a fast food resturant, as I enjoy working with young people - you know kinda take them under my wing. When I was a supervisor at the hospital, I had several high school and college students working for me - they were my best employees. Right now there is too much paper work involved in healthcare and everything has to be documented in every residents chart if they fight at the table, if they spit out their food if they gain or loose weight - it is a nightmare! BUT as I said I enjoy young people and I am hoping that I hear from the fast food resturant, even though I am 52 years young, overweight and have health conditions, I was able to work at the nursing home when someone called off up to 15 hours a day! Take Care - keep in touch! :wink:

  3. #13
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    Hi ninny52 It's good to hear from you again. I was born in Illinois, Spring Valley to be exact. Do you cook or what do you usually do in food service? Where are you applying for work? Some places don't really pay all that much, but I guess you already know that. I worked as a cook many years ago. That was when minimum wage was around $1.90 an hour or so. I asked for a raise after an extremely busy shift where I covered for 2 other cooks that were out that day due to sickness. I got laid off. Taught me something, I guess. My next job, I was THE cook. It was a smaller place. They only needed 1 and I was asked to work there. That made me feel better. Anyway, my next "career" was at H & R Block. I took their course in 1983, was hired for the tax season and enjoyed 3 1/2 months of work. Then I had to get a job that would last all year around. I got a job [b]at a [b]nursing home. I couldn't fix the things that were wrong there, but stayed about 6 months until I started nursing school. I got out of school in February of 1986. I went to college for a year or 2 getting a start on credits toward being an RN, but due to family stuff, I dropped out after about a year and a half. So I'm an LPN [low paid nurse - that's what some of us call it in jest], but unemployed.
    I agree, there's way too much paperwork to do in the healthcare field. Where I had worked we documented medications a bunch of different places. If it was tylenol- it was marked on the MAR, on the back of the MAR, on the Daily Record, on the Count Sheet, in the Nurses Notes and in the Report Book. The HTS staff also had to call the Health Care Coordinator whenever they gave a PRN [as needed] medication.
    If you have any interest in taking care of people with developmental disabilities, you could inquire at the DHS in your area. They usually have a list of agencies that manage the care of those folks. Lots of them have their own homes or group homes. The staff at them is more younger people, younger than us, anyway. They pay you while you are training. It's so much easier than nursing home work. You are sort of like a companion. You help them with daily living. I mostly worked night shift. My guy slept pretty well most of the time. Then I watched TV, did a chore now and then when there was one to do. I also made nightgowns and bibs for my clients. I kept my sewing machine at work.
    Think about that, OK? It's just an idea. You sound like a nice person that likes to help others. The job I'm talking about makes you feel good about yourself so much more than the nursing home because you can spend quality time with your client [when they are awake] and see their appreciation in their eyes. It's cool, I think. Well, write back when you have time. Good luck with your job searching.
    grannytoni
    gosh, i'm longwinded! :?
    PEACE ON EARTH

  4. #14
    Ellen-Fan
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninny52
    Myself, I am a diabetic, have high blood pressure, arthritis, anxiet and depression, plus graves disease.
    Are we related? :lol:

    Save the diabetes (though my late mother was a raging diabetic & knowing that this endocrinological disorder tends to have genetic ties, I'm waiting...), I am also hypertentive, arthritic, & have Graves, too...which is why I am usually up posting in the middle of the night, LOL.

    Are you, by chance, bi-polar, instead? That commonly hits those w/ thyroid disorders & often the patients can be mis-dx'ed.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninny52
    My grandmother on the other hand (this would be my mother's mom) had 73 grandchildren, great grandchildren and great great grandchildren when she passed away 24 years ago this month, and believe me the family has multiplied!
    I have a sinking suspicion that this will be me in the future, LOL. If all of my children ended up being as "wild & crazy" as we've been, that would be 120 grandchildren alone, not even counting future generations...8O Realistically speaking, if each of the children had just two offspring, that would bring 48.

    I, too, have wondered how we will cope @ holiday times once our own progeny begin to procreate. Thankfully, none of our children are spoiled, but, logically, those in large families cannot be. Even before all were born (before this plan became a "necessity"), there were gift & spending limits in place...we weren't about to spend a couple of hundred per child each Christmas. Now that they're all here though, I'm glad that it played out this way. Hopefully, they won't go the opposite way when they have children of their own.

    Christmas is far too comercialized, but there is still that nagging feeling that you must do something for it. Just do what you can & do it w/ love. Even if it means going to a dollar store & coming away w/ 5 or 6 things, some of those stores can surprise you w/ what they offer.

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